Originally buttermilk, was the liquid left over after churning butter, hence the name. Bacteria would grow and begin to ferment the lactose found naturally in the liquid (milk), It’s the resulting lactic acid which gives buttermilk its zingy, tart taste.

The reason for using buttermilk in recipes for scones, soda bread, and pancakes is because the acid in the buttermilk reacts with the alkali in the bicarbonate of soda to produce carbonic acid bubbles which cause the bread or scones to rise.

Buttermilk also good used in salad dressings and as part of a marinade (in both cases obviously combined with some oil) for chicken.

two methods for making buttermilk:

method one:

  • 1 tbsp lemon juice or white wine vinegar
  • 1 cup/250 ml full-fat (whole) milk
  1. add the milk to the lemon juice (not the other way around) and leave for five minutes

method two:

mix equal quantities of Greek yoghurt with whole milk (again add the milk to the acidic yoghurt), leave for five minutes.

For best results, add the milk to the acidic ingredient, rather than the other way around, and allow 5-10 minutes for the ingredients to react with each other. The exact measurements are not critical, so if you only have a teaspoon of lemon juice rather than a tablespoon, for example, you’ll still get buttermilk. Don’t overdo the acid, or you’ll get a sour-tasting result.

Also, you can refrigerate the buttermilk to use later.

You can make a very good buttermilk salad dressing with four tablespoons of buttermilk, 1 tablespoon of white wine vinegar, 2 teaspoons of golden caster sugar, some smoked salt and Indonesian long black pepper.

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